9/11

Remembering 911

This is a repost from 2011 but the content is still relevent. There is nothing that makes evil more angry than to make beauty from ashes. I absolutely LOVE that September 11th is now the National Day of Service. Although I know there will be a lot of grief, some so deep it will feel overwhelming. But what better way to honor those who died and gave their lives than to serve others. Originally, I had thought I would be glued to the TV on this day, reliving and crying. But now I actually feel hope for the day. My family is excited to be a part of the KLOVE Million Lives. I encourage you to join us!

Natalie’s Thoughts-

I was walking my dog. It was a BEAUTIFUL day- I remember looking at the sky and noticing how blue it was. However, on the inside I was having a pity party for myself. I had just come home from a long weekend at a friend’s wedding. I was feeling sorry for myself that the weekend was over and I was heading into a job that I didn’t enjoy or get much fulfillment from. I was trying to talk myself into it but landing in the pit of my own negative thinking. Until that moment.. My neighbor asked me if I knew what was happening and filled me in.

I remember thinking about how at the moment I was feeling bad for myself, people were trapped in a building that was starting to crumble. People were on a plane that they knew was going to crash. That morning, they probably woke up, took their kids to daycare or walked their dog- just like I had been doing, got a cup of coffee, maybe even mumbled to the man at the elevator. They had no idea what was going to happen to them. It hit me that everything- EVERYTHING can change in an instant.

Because of that day, when I start my grumbling in my head, I always remember there is someone who would do anything to have my problems. They may have it so much worse. I also remember that each day truly is a gift and we must leave our loved ones with the thought of “If this is the last time I see them, would I be at peace with how I left?” I know we can’t linger on and on in the morning with long good-byes, but do you actually kiss your spouse and say you love them or mumble a good bye while you have your head in the refrigerator, looking for the OJ? Do you love on your kids or do you just walk out the door? I’m sure many people who lost their family members would do anything to change how they left that morning. Make every kiss, hug, or love you count. This is what I have learned and changed from 9/11.

Written by Natalie Chandler

Natalie Chandler, MA, LMHC is a therapist at Imagine Hope Counseling Group. Natalie enjoys doing marriage counseling, individual counseling, and couples counseling. We also specialize in family counseling, child, and adolescent counseling. Imagine Hope serves the Indianapolis area including the surrounding areas of Carmel, Fishers, Noblesville, Westfield, and Zionsville

Remembering 9/11- Teri

***This post was originally written in 2011, however we feel best to remember these lessons all the time! It is amazing that 9/11 happened 10 years ago. Our world is a different place now. War is a normal reality. Awareness of terrorism is heightened. The world still grieves the tragedy of it all.

This week each of us at Imagine Hope will share about experiences, life perspectives, and changes we have had since that day.

Teri’s Thoughts

I never realized how much I took advantage of the feeling of “safety”. Growing up I felt the freedom and safety to ride bikes unchaperoned with my friends, to roam the neighborhood, and to trust most people around me.  After 9/11, I have been more aware that safety is something that is fought for. I realize the extent that our military and law enforcement agencies go to that most are typically oblivious to. My appreciation and admiration for what others sacrifice can never be measured.

I encourage all of us to look around and seek out opportunities to provide others with safety and to thank those around us that do. Next time you are at the airport and are waiting in long lines, take time to thank the workers who are carefully seeking to keep you and your family safe. Instead of being frustrated at having to pull off for safety vehicles running lights and sirens, say thank you and say a prayer for them to remain safe wherever they are headed. Next time you see an aging person pushing a cart of groceries at the store, offer to help them or put their cart away in the parking lot for them.

It’s time for us to be grateful for our experiences of safety in our communities and to help those around us to stay safe. Reach out to those around you and pay it forward, rather than living in your own little world. We are a community. Let’s keep it a safe one!

Written by Teri Claassen MSW, LCSW, LCAC

Teri Claassen MSW, LCSW, LCAC is a licensed therapist at Imagine Hope Counseling Group. Teri does virtual therapy for residents of Indiana and Florida using videoconferencing technology. Teri enjoys doing marriage counseling, individual counseling, couples and relationship counseling. Teri also does family counseling and adolescent counseling.

Remembering 9/11- Joleen

Like most Americans, 9/11 is burned into my memory as an event that truly changed our country.  One of the things we teach our clients in therapy (and actively live in our own lives as therapists) is to learn how to make sense from tragedy by seeing it as an opportunity to grow and change.  I never would have thought 10 years ago that this would be possible from the events of 9/11, but as I look at the camaraderie, unity, strength and hope our nation gained from this event, it reminds me of how truly blessed we are as Americans. Joleen's thoughts:

The morning of 9/11 started for me, like most of my days during that time of my life.  I was still in the very beginning stages of working as a therapist, and struggling with finding some sense of balance in my life (and not doing very well at it!).  I was working long hours, trying to adjust to being away from my extended family and support system for the first time in my life, having moved from out of state.  Because I was so busy and consumed with work, I rarely turned the television on, and hadn't yet reached out to find a support system or develop friendships in Indianapolis.  That morning, I received a phone call from my dad, who asked me to please turn the television on and informed me of the catastrophic events that had taken place that morning.  I remember having a very emotionally connected and vulnerable conversation with him, while trying to make sense out of what was happening.  I remember feeling so vulnerable, and realizing the isolation I had allowed myself to fall into through my lack of priorities.  All I wanted to do was drive back home to my family, to make sure they were safe, and to feel safe myself.

What is really important in life?

In the days that followed 9/11, I watched our country rally together, seeing a renewed sense of American spirit, pride, and protectiveness that I can imagine we probably haven't seen for a few generations.  I saw a country come together and get back to the basics-- it felt like a shift of focus from being successful and productive to a focus on relationships, and concern and help for others-- exactly what I was experiencing myself.  It wasn't long after that when I started to get more balance in my life.  It truly made me realize the importance of family, relationship, and fellowship.  We wouldn't have made it through 9/11 without those who volunteered their brave service to our country in it's many forms during a time of need.  We wouldn't have made it through 9/11 if our nation wouldn't have set aside the things that divide us-- like debates over class, status, gender, color or race, in order to band together and help others as Americans.  My hope in remembering 9/11 is that our nation doesn't forget that part, either-- the sense of unity, faith and unending hope that our country received through such a tragedy.  God truly gives us lessons from adversity, and I pray that as a country, we not only remember and honor the lives that were lost from this experience, but also the strength that our nation has been blessed with as a result-- and those that are continuing to fight for our country and what we stand for.  Let us not forget what is truly important in life.

As you remember the events of 9/11, what thoughts and memories do you have?  As always, we appreciate you reading this week's blog. 

Joleen Watson, MS, NCC, is a therapist at Imagine Hope Counseling Group. She enjoys doing marriage counseling, relationship counseling, couples counseling, and individual counseling.  Imagine Hope also specializes in family, child and adolescent counseling and serves Indianapolis area including the surrounding areas of Carmel, Noblesville, Zionsville, Westfield, and Fishers.

Remembering 9/11- Natalie

There is nothing that makes evil more angry than to make beauty from ashes. I absolutely LOVE that September 11th is now the National Day of Service. Although I know there will be a lot of grief, some so deep it will feel overwhelming. But what better way to honor those who died and gave their lives than to serve others. Originally, I had thought I would be glued to the TV on this day, reliving and crying. But now I actually feel hope for the day. My family is excited to be a part of the KLOVE Million Lives. I encourage you to join us! Natalie's Thoughts-

I was walking my dog. It was a BEAUTIFUL day- I remember looking at the sky and noticing how blue it was. However, on the inside I was having a pity party for myself. I had just come home from a long weekend at a friend's wedding. I was feeling sorry for myself that the weekend was over and I was heading into a job that I didn't enjoy or get much fulfillment from. I was trying to talk myself into it but landing in the pit of my own negative thinking. Until that moment.. My neighbor asked me if I knew what was happening and filled me in.

I remember thinking about how at the moment I was feeling bad for myself, people were trapped in a building that was starting to crumble. People were on a plane that they knew was going to crash. That morning, they probably woke up, took their kids to daycare or walked their dog- just like I had been doing, got a cup of coffee, maybe even mumbled to the man at the elevator. They had no idea what was going to happen to them. It hit me that everything- EVERYTHING can change in an instant.

Because of that day, when I start my grumbling in my head, I always remember there is someone who would do anything to have my problems. They may have it so much worse. I also remember that each day truly is a gift and we must leave our loved ones with the thought of "If this is the last time I see them, would I be at peace with how I left?" I know we can't linger on and on in the morning with long good-byes, but do you actually kiss your spouse and say you love them or mumble a good bye while you have your head in the refrigerator, looking for the OJ? Do you love on your kids or do you just walk out the door? I'm sure many people who lost their family members would do anything to change how they left that morning. Make every kiss, hug, or love you count. This is what I have learned and changed from 9/11.

Written by Natalie Chandler

Natalie Chandler, MA, LMHC is a therapist at Imagine Hope Counseling Group. Natalie enjoys doing marriage counseling, individual counseling, and couples counseling.  We also specialize in family counseling, child, and adolescent counseling. Imagine Hope serves the Indianapolis area including the surrounding areas of Carmel, Fishers, Noblesville, Westfield, and Zionsville.