What Does Healthy Self-Esteem Look Like? #4

In our society, the term "self-esteem" is frequently used, but what exactly does it look like to have "high self-esteem" or "low self-esteem"?  This week, Imagine Hope is discussing the characteristics of both high and low self-esteem.  Yesterday, Natalie reviewed several different ways a person with low self-esteem might behave.  Today we will continue wrap up with the rest of the characteristics of low self-esteem and provide some resources that might be of interest to you! 6.  A person with low self-esteem may reject many of their own feelings and desires as unacceptable.  Sometimes, a person with low self-esteem doesn't feel worthy of these feelings and desires.

7.  A person with low self-esteem doesn't express their feelings or opinions for fear that other people will not like what they are saying.  The result is that the other person has no idea what they want and this guarantees that the person with low self-esteem will not get what they need.

8.  A person with low self-esteem is likely to be less popular than people with high self-esteem because of the gloomy outlook they project and their dependency on others.  Others may feel burdened about having to build their egos.

Attitudes about oneself are not built into genes but are learned from a number of sources.  People are taught to view themselves as possessing high or low self-esteem by their families, by teachers, churches and society.  Anything learned can be unlearned.  The hopeful message is that it is possible to increase self-esteem no matter what your age.  It is never too late!  People can always learn new things, feel better about themselves and change their lives.  If you really want to work at raising your self-esteem, it can be done.

Want more information on self-esteem?  Here are some good resources to check out:

Self-Esteem by Matthew McKay and Patrick Fanning

The Self-Esteem Workbook by Glenn Schiraldi

Self Matters by Phil McGraw

The Dark Side of the Light Chasers by Debbie Ford